World Health Statistics 2015 Released! (13 May 2015)

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently released the World Health Statistics 2015.

Key Messages:

  • Life expectancy at birth has increased 6 years for both men and women since 1990.

Men: 62 (1990) to 68 (2013)    Women: 67 (1990) to 73 (2013)

  • Two-thirds of deaths worldwide are due to noncommunicable diseases.

 Age Standardized Mortality Rates by cause:
Communicable diseases: 178/100,000 population                                                             Non-Communicable diseases: 539/100,000 population                                                     Injuries: 73/100,000 population    

  • In some countries, more than one-third (33%) of births are delivered by caesarean section: Uruguay 40%; Mexico 46%; Iran 48%; Cyprus 52%; Brazil and Dominican Republic 56% (this is a partial list of countries with >33% LSCS Rate)
  • In low- and middle-income countries, only two-thirds of pregnant women with HIV receive antiretrovirals to prevent transmission to their baby.
  • Over one-third of adult men smoke tobacco.
  • Only 1 in 3 African children with suspected pneumonia receives antibiotics.
  • 15% of women worldwide are obese.
  • The median age of people living in low-income countries is 20 years, while it is 40 years in high-income countries.
  • One quarter (25%) of men have raised blood pressure.
  • In some countries, less than 5% of total government expenditure is on health.

Useful Links:

Link to the WHO Press release:

Link to the World Health Statistics 2015 (entire document):

Link to the World Health Statistics page (to download each section separately):

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